London Bird Club Wiki

Editing

Talk:LatestNews

2
  • This is a talk page. Please remember to sign your posts using four tildes (~~~~) or the signature button
  • The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit. If you are undoing an edit that is …
This is a talk page. Please remember to sign your posts using four tildes (~~~~) or the signature button
+
Latest revision Your text
Line 46: Line 46:
 
''I doubt nesting is the main issue. Sparrows disappeared suddenly from Golders Hill Park area in 2000 despite no change in nest site availability. The presence of sparrows around Covent Garden and Fleet Street is now a regular joy for me (maybe for a year). There is a pub in Kemble Street with seed feeders as well as ivy that has them most of the time. I would not be surprised if this is a disease resistant group, or a group that has learnt some new trick of food usage. I think there must be quite a number of birds in the area (Jo Edwards). ''
 
''I doubt nesting is the main issue. Sparrows disappeared suddenly from Golders Hill Park area in 2000 despite no change in nest site availability. The presence of sparrows around Covent Garden and Fleet Street is now a regular joy for me (maybe for a year). There is a pub in Kemble Street with seed feeders as well as ivy that has them most of the time. I would not be surprised if this is a disease resistant group, or a group that has learnt some new trick of food usage. I think there must be quite a number of birds in the area (Jo Edwards). ''
   
Possibly combination of loss of nest sites some shrubs, bushes or rough ground where they feed. Mystery how sparrows survive around Drury Lane and Covent Garden/Long Acre when there aren't much food sources (wild flower meadows etc) when Hyde Park which has loads of wild areas has no sparrows and also no old buildings to provide nest sites. On the Churchhill Gardens Housing Estate in Pimlico there is a successful colony of about 20 pairs in a small pyracantha hedge in a well vegetated but small garden, there are feeders up on balcony's and the birds manage to keep breeding inspite of being in a built up area, with lots of traffic(fumes) around, yet this is the only one in Central London, the hedge is very unique - tall but not too dense but with large thorns round the outside. '''In the last 4 years in less than 1 Kilometer area of SW London - west Stockwell to Battersea Power Station I have seen 25 active house sparrow nest sites filled by refurbishment work and in 2 cases demolition of the brick buildings both residential, containing the nest sites (to make way for brand new buildings of various kinds that probably don't have any cavities to replace the ones lost) - visible proof the last sparrows are being driven out of this area by lost of nest sites! And that attitudes and beliefs (belief there is no clear reason and therefore out of human control) about house sparrows held by RSPB etc is allowing this to happen. (Michael Mac 2018)'''
+
Possibly combination of loss of nest sites some shrubs, bushes or rough ground where they feed. Mystery how sparrows survive around Drury Lane and Covent Garden/Long Acre when there aren't much food sources (wild flower meadows etc) when Hyde Park which has loads of wild areas has no sparrows and also no old buildings to provide nest sites. On the Churchhill Gardens Housing Estate in Pimlico there is a successful colony of about 20 pairs in a small pyracantha hedge in a well vegetated but small garden, there are feeders up on balcony's and the birds manage to keep breeding inspite of being in a built up area, with lots of traffic(fumes) around, yet this is the only one in Central London, the hedge is very unique - tall but not too dense but with large thorns round the outside. '''In the last 4 years in less than 1 Kilometer area of SW London - west Stockwell to Battersea Power Station I have seen 25 active house sparrow nest sites filled by refurbishment work and in 2 cases demolition of the brick buildings both residential, containing the nest sites (to make way for brand new buildings of various kinds that probably don't have any cavities to replace the ones lost) - visible proof the last sparrows are being driven out of this area by lost of nest sites! And that attitudes and beliefs about house sparrows held by RSPB etc is allowing this to happen. (Michael Mac 2018)'''
   
 
''House Sparrows are a colonial species. They communicate constantly to keep in contact with their immediate neighbours. They are also a sedentary species, so don't migrate distances out of habit. Here's my reason(s) for the decline of House Sparrows in urban areas. (1) Low breeding success due to pollution affecting the availability of the insects they need to feed their young. (2) Loss of nest sites to some extent. However, the main reason is that House Sparrows won't cross a space unless it can hear another House Sparrow. In New Zealand, the House Sparrows I studied, spread themselves out, but kept connected to each via sight and sound. One only had to throw some food out to see how the network functioned. Where gaps in the population appear due to (1) & (2). The remaining birds become ever more isolated in pockets. You will note this yourself no doubt. The great mass of birds subsequently become groups, then a few birds and finally just one. (Richard Francis).''
 
''House Sparrows are a colonial species. They communicate constantly to keep in contact with their immediate neighbours. They are also a sedentary species, so don't migrate distances out of habit. Here's my reason(s) for the decline of House Sparrows in urban areas. (1) Low breeding success due to pollution affecting the availability of the insects they need to feed their young. (2) Loss of nest sites to some extent. However, the main reason is that House Sparrows won't cross a space unless it can hear another House Sparrow. In New Zealand, the House Sparrows I studied, spread themselves out, but kept connected to each via sight and sound. One only had to throw some food out to see how the network functioned. Where gaps in the population appear due to (1) & (2). The remaining birds become ever more isolated in pockets. You will note this yourself no doubt. The great mass of birds subsequently become groups, then a few birds and finally just one. (Richard Francis).''
  Loading editor
Below are some commonly used wiki markup codes. Simply click on what you want to use and it will appear in the edit box above.

View this template